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Cognitive Behaviour Therapy & Mindfulness

Cognitive Behaviour Therapy & Mindfulness

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The ethics of using a charity and its associated risks

The ethics of using a charity and its associated risks

The ethics of using a charity and its associated risks

 

The idea of getting something for nothing is considered a win, but it rarely works that way. A charity offering free support when you need it might come back and ask for a donation time and time again. Once they have their hook in, they will use every emotional method to seek more and more contributions. After all, some cannot survive without the generosity of their client base. There is a lot said about giving freely but when you are tagged as a potential giver you will be encouraged to part with more of your hard-earned cash.

 

That is why Angels212 is a “Pay As You Go” service. You pay for the support you receive and there is no onward or future obligation. We believe when you lose someone special you need our support to help you through the dark days and nights. You need good solid honest support to help you through a difficult period in your life.

 

Charities that raise monies outside their support client base are by us, highly commended. We do frown upon those charities whose modus operandi is to seek reward from the people they help. That is deliberately taking advantage of a vulnerable person (often referred to as “Milking” your clients.)

 

Angels212 are a specialist online Cognitive Behavioural Therapy service designed and run by trained healthcare professionals, dedicated to helping you recover from the loss of a significant other, either through death or the break-up of a long-term relationship.

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When a partner leaves you or dies it’s like the oxygen being switched off.

When a partner leaves you or dies it’s like the oxygen being switched off.

We take breathing so much for granted, we hardly give it a thought. But take it away from us and panic sets in very quickly. Nothing matters but getting a lungful of fresh air.


And, that is true when you lose someone. You suddenly realize how important they are, how much you love them and how desperate you are to get them back into your life. Death of a partner means that’s impossible, but it’s still your one and only wish. With a break-up, you search for reconciliation. But, if your partner won’t speak to you or communicate with you they are adding to the hurt and sucking the oxygen right out of you.


Much loved partners and life-giving oxygen are very similar. We tend to take them for granted but when they are taken from us, we are in big trouble. Functioning becomes difficult and we don’t think we can exist without them. With Oxygen that is true. But for those that have lost a significant other, help is available.


It takes time but with the help of organizations like Angels212, a life-line is accessible. Angels212 helps you through the pain and suffering at a time when encouragement and understanding is vital. Yes, you are at a low point in your life, but it does not detract from the truth that your future is important, your mental wellbeing is important, your happiness and fulfilment is important. Indeed, life is important.


With every disaster comes opportunity and to overcome adversity you first need a sympathetic supporter who understands your pain. Then, when you are ready, you need goals, goals that will test you but are achievable, goals that make you happy, goals that give you confidence. And, goals that define who you are.
For more information, please visit www.angels212.com

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Rumination is often part of the grieving process

Rumination is often part of the grieving process

One of the primary obstacles to getting over the loss of someone you loved is rumination.

 

Rumination is an integral process in maintaining your depression. Most people with depression are likely to engage in some rumination, even if they’re not aware that they do it.


Rumination is a circular thought process in which you go over the same things again and again. You focus on trying to work out the root cause of your loss and the events that have contributed to your loss. You are asking the same questions over and over again.


Why is this happening to me?


What could I have done to stop this happening?


If only this hadn’t happened, I’d be ok.


Depression makes people feel compelled to ruminate. In a sense, rumination is like a faulty attempt to solve problems. Rumination is compelling because your depressed mood tells you that you must try to get to the bottom of why. But rumination simply doesn’t work; you end up trying to solve your depression by going over the same old ground and looking for answers inside the problem. You focus your attention on how depressed you feel, which leads to you feeling more depressed.


It is important to get help to overcome this difficult hurdle in your grieving process. Being open about ruminating is a good start and your psychologist or counsellor can set you tasks to tackle this.

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A broken heart can become a broken heart

A broken heart can become a broken heart

A broken heart can cause more than just emotional pain. New research shows heartbreak may cause lasting damage that can increase the risk of developing other heart-related conditions in the future.

 

A recent study from researchers at the University of Aberdeen found that so-called “broken heart syndrome” can leave physical scars that never disappear.

Broken heart syndrome is typically caused by an intense emotional stress, such as the death of, or abandonment by, a loved one. The condition actually damages the heart’s left ventricle so badly, it changes its shape. In fact, the official term for the condition is “takotsubo syndrome,” a term first used in Japan in 1990 to describe the “octopus pot” shape that the ventricle morphs into.

 

Dr. Sherry Grace, a member of the Peter Munk Cardiac Centre in Toronto, says the condition itself isn’t new, but our understanding of it is.

“So what happens is the heart muscle is weakened temporarily and so you get a bit of ballooning in that major left ventricle that’s the main pumping chamber,

 

Not all sadness brings on heart damage, of course, but those who experience a severe shock can often begin to feel chest pain intense enough that it sends them to hospital. There, doctors will typically notice none of the classic signs of heart attacks, such as blocked heart arteries.

 

Broken heart syndrome is relatively rare, says Grace: only about one or two per cent of suspected heart attacks turn out to be caused by the syndrome. Approximately 90 per cent of cases occur in women, who are typically around the age of 65, and of Asian or Caucasian background.

 

Those who have had mental health problems, such as anxiety, or neurological conditions, such as seizures, are also more likely to develop the syndrome.

It’s long been thought that the syndrome’s effects didn’t last, but new research suggests that may not be the case.

 

With this syndrome, it was thought that it was very temporary, and that only for a few weeks was the heart pumping functioning compromised. But now they see that it lasts for months later, which is very disturbing,

 

The new research was conducted on several dozen patients with broken heart syndrome who were followed for four months. The researchers used ultrasound and cardiac MRI scans of patients' hearts and found that parts of the hearts’ muscles had been replaced with fine scars, which reduce the elasticity of the heart and prevent it from contracting properly.

 

They say that their findings could explain why people with the syndrome tend to have the same life expectancy as those who have suffered a heart attack. It might also explain why some with broken heart syndrome go on to develop heart failure. Grace says it’s not known if it’s possible to repair a heart damaged in this way.

“We don’t know any cures and we don’t know how to prevent it,” she said.

 

Medications for anxiety can help reduce further stress to the heart, and beta blockers can help with pumping function. But she adds that it’s long been known that emotional factors, such as social isolation, anxiety and stress can play a role in traditional heart disease. So she recommends taking the usual steps to avoid heart disease: quitting smoking, exercising, eating well, and caring for our mental health. The full study appears in the Journal of the American Society of Echocardiography.

 

Getting help for your heartache and heartbreak is truly important. Here at Angels212 we work hard at helping our members overcome their pain.  

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Two Thirds of UK Adults Have Nobody To Talk About

Two Thirds of UK Adults Have Nobody To Talk About

The BBC reported this month that a survey has found of the 2,500 people questioned, 66% said they had no one to speak to about mental health, relationships or money.


Difficulty finding the right time or place to talk were given as reasons behind the trend, the survey by mental health campaign Time to Change said.
The campaign's director Sue Baker OBE said hard work was needed by everyone to break down "barriers to talking".


More than a third (36%) of those questioned said they could never find the right time to raise their problems, while 28% said they had not spoken to anybody as they could not find anywhere appropriate to raise their concerns.

 

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Just over 22% said they had waited for a year for the "perfect" moment to discuss their issues.

 

The survey by the Time to Change project has been released to coincide with Time to Talk Day, which is backed by charities Mind and Rethink Mental Illness.
Ms Baker said: "People still think there is no right time or place to talk about mental health - that it's something that should be whispered about in quiet corners.


"Conversations have the power to change lives, wherever they take place. So whether you're at home, at work, in the cinema, or even in the car, Time to Talk Day (1 February) is the perfect chance to be more open about mental health."


Secretary of State for Health and Social Care Jeremy Hunt added: "Too many people still feel unable to talk about their mental health.
"Time to Talk Day is an important reminder of the power of conversation, and how by taking small steps to help others we can all make our own contribution to a better and more mentally resilient society."


The survey comes just weeks after the government announced new measures to help combat loneliness and social isolation in the UK.
Prime Minister Theresa May said in January that a series of policy changes - including the creation of a loneliness minister - would be introduced following recommendations from the Jo Cox Commission, which campaigns on the issue.


Research carried out by the commission found that almost 200,000 older people had not had a conversation with a friend or relative in more than a month.
It also said that more than nine million people in the UK described themselves as "always or often lonely".

Tips for starting conversations:


1. Start small -Many people find talking in person intimidating, and that is understandable. But it does not need to stop you from starting a conversation altogether. You could make a quick phone call, send your best mate a text, or leave a note for a parent.
2. Time and place - Sometimes it is easier to talk side by side rather than face to face. So, if you do talk in person, you might want to chat while you are doing something else. You could start a conversation when you're walking, cooking or stuck in traffic.
3. Gentle questions - There are lots of misconceptions around mental illness. That means asking questions can be an important way of learning. Just remember not to get too personal and be aware if the discussion is making someone feel uncomfortable.
4. Be open - Being open and honest with others can help to build trust. For example, you might choose to tell your friend something about you that they may not know. Just remember, do not feel pressure to share anything that you are not comfortable with.
5. Treat people the same - When someone is diagnosed with a mental illness, they are still the same person as they were before. And that means when a friend or loved one opens up about mental health, they do not want to be treated any differently. If you want to support them, keep it simple. Do the things you would normally do.

Angels212 supports people who have lost someone very special to them. It is much easier to talk about how you feel than seek help from a book. An Amazon.com Book Search of key phrases associated with relationship loss yielded several tens of thousands of results: Breakup = 47,578 Results, Break up = 140,820 Results, Breaking up = 67,838 Results, Bereavement = 37,564 Results, Grief = 219,002 Results, Divorce = 177,445 Results.

 

That’s quite a lofty stack of books to sift through and discern one’s best options. And even if we give way and order the 2 or 3 best rated books we’re still left with the daunting task of reading, digesting, and applying their advice. It's difficult doing it alone and that's why Angels212 works for its members.

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The physical effects of heartbreak are just as real as the mental anguish

The physical effects of heartbreak are just as real as the mental anguish

A bereavement of a loved one is difficult for everyone with grief being a natural reaction to any significant loss. At Angels 212 we can’t stress the importance to recognise these feelings and deal with them, rather than pushing them under the surface where they will manifest and become more difficult to deal with.

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The writer of Robbie Williams’s ‘Angels’ reveals the meaning behind the lyrics

The writer of Robbie Williams’s ‘Angels’ reveals the meaning behind the lyrics

It was back in the Christmas of 1996 when Robbie Williams, holidaying in Dublin, met Ray Heffernan. The two shared some drinks and Ray, a budding songwriter and performer played him a song he was working on called ‘An Angel Instead’.

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Five ways to support your partner who is battling depression

Five ways to support your partner who is battling depression

 

Depression is a complicated matter, one that is murky and builds up overtime through traumatic experiences such as a personal bereavement or the breakdown of a relationship.

To heal, a person who is battling depression first needs to work through the things that are going on inside of their own head, which means confronting truths that are hard to deal with.

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Five things that depression can steal from you

Five things that depression can steal from you

Depression can manifest itself in many ways, affecting each person who is battling it differently from the next, and can be caused by many different things such as the death of a loved one, the loss of a job and even moving away from your social circles.

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Celebrities and depression… the truth

Celebrities and depression… the truth

Talking about your own mental health struggles is never easy, from opening up to a close friend or tweeting your feelings to the online world, it takes courage to let people know how you are truly feeling.

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